The GOP Budget, Fiscal Responsibility and Part D

Joe Paduda

Posted 4/06/12 on Managed Care Matters

Rep. Paul Ryan (R WI) and the House Republicans are touting their budget as fiscally responsible and prudent. What Mr Ryan conveniently forgets, or more likely avoids, is this:

Eight short years ago he – and his GOP buddies – passed the single largest entitlement program since Medicare – the Medicare Part D drug benefit – with no dedicated financing, no offsets and no revenue-generators – the entire future cost –which is now around sixteen trillion dollars [see page 148] – simply added to the federal budget deficit.

According to Bruce Bartlett writing in the Fiscal Times, “By 2030, Part D alone will cost taxpayers 1 percent of GDP.”

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The Hypocritical and Reckless Attacks on the Ryan Medicare Plan

James C. Capretta

First published 5/2/11 on Kaiser Health News

It should be obvious by now that the president of the United States and his political allies are hoping to ride demonization of House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s Medicare reform proposal all the way to electoral victory in November 2012.

Following the president’s April 13 campaign-style budget speech, in which he aimed his most intense partisan fire at the Ryan Medicare plan, the entire Democratic political machine has taken the cue and gotten cranked up. In recent days, the party’s campaign committees began running attack ads against the Ryan plan — a full year and a half before the next election. Professional agitators have been rounded up to heckle members of Congress in their districts. And a legion of administration apologists has filled the blogosphere and newspaper opinion pages with outrage — outrage! — at the “cruelty” of the Ryan plan.

Continue reading “The Hypocritical and Reckless Attacks on the Ryan Medicare Plan”

There Aren’t Enough Rich People To Pay For Medicare and Medicaid

Robert Laszewski

First published 4/21/11 on Kaiser Health News

I hear more and more of my progressive friends arguing, in the context of deficit reduction, that we should be raising taxes before getting aggressive about reducing the cost of Medicare and Medicaid — as well as Social Security.

To a point, I agree.

This country is in such a hole that it is senseless to deny that at least some new taxes will be needed to pay for all of the nation’s bailouts and accumulated debts.

Continue reading “There Aren’t Enough Rich People To Pay For Medicare and Medicaid”