Addressing Gaps in End-Of-Life Planning

Kenneth Lin

Posted 3/15/12 on Common Sense Family Doctor

A recent article by family physician Ken Murray in the Wall Street Journal, titled “Why Doctors Die Differently,” observed that doctors are more likely than other people to decline end-of-life interventions that have little likelihood of benefit:

It’s not something that we like to talk about, but doctors die, too. What’s unusual about them is not how much treatment they get compared with most Americans, but how little. They know exactly what is going to happen, they know the choices, and they generally have access to any sort of medical care that they could want. But they tend to go serenely and gently.

Doctors don’t want to die any more than anyone else does. But they usually have talked about the limits of modern medicine with their families. They want to make sure that, when the time comes, no heroic measures are taken. During their last moments, they know, for instance, that they don’t want someone breaking their ribs by performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (which is what happens when CPR is done right).

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