HealthTap: The Emperor’s New Clothes of Social Sites

Michael Millenson

Posted 1/08/12 on Forbes

You can’t get much cooler than HealthTap: slick Silicon Valley start-up, social media darlingsavvy and successful backers. But when you closely examine the service HealthTap actually provides, the money and good looks fall away. Like in the fable about “the emperor’s new clothes,” behind the buzz, there’s nothing there.

OK, maybe one thing: a really risky way to get medical advice.

Here’s how a Feb. 4 New York Times article described the company’s website:

[U]sers post questions and doctors post brief answers. The service is free, and the doctors aren’t paid. Instead, they engage in gamelike competitions, earning points and climbing numbered levels. They can also receive nonmonetary awards — many of them whimsically named, like the “It’s Not Brain Surgery” prize, earned for answering 21 questions at the site.

Fellow physicians can show that they concur with the advice offered by clicking “Agree,” and users can show their appreciation with a “Thank” button.

Continue reading “HealthTap: The Emperor’s New Clothes of Social Sites”

Health Care Social Media – How to Engage Online Without Getting into Trouble (Part II)

David Harlow

Posted 1/05/12 on HealthBlawg

I have been asked to write up some of the core takeaways from the health care social media presentations I have been giving recently, so I am sharing a version of this narrative on HealthBlawg, in two parts.  You may wish to begin with Part I

Professional responsibility and malpractice liability

The American Medical Association has promulgated a social media policy; so has theVeterans Administration.  The two represent very different approaches.  The AMA essentially advocates proceeding with caution, and being cognizant of the damage that one’s own social media activities – and one’s colleagues’ – may do to the profession.  The VA, on the other hand, is out in front on this issue – just as it was with electronic health records – encouraging the use of social media tools to disseminate information and engage patients and caregivers in productive dialogue likely to improve overall wellbeing and health care outcomes.

Continue reading “Health Care Social Media – How to Engage Online Without Getting into Trouble (Part II)”

Health Care Social Media – How to Engage Online Without Getting into Trouble (Part I)

David Harlow

Posted 1/03/11 on HealthBlawg

I have been asked recently to write up some of the core takeaways from the health care social media presentations I have been giving recently, so I am sharing a version of this narrative in two parts.  Check back soon for Part II

Introduction

“Why do you rob banks?”

“That’s where the money is.”

The legendary bank robber Willie Sutton, when asked, gave this straightforward response explaining his motivation.  A similar motivation may be ascribed to the early adopters among health care providers who have established beachheads on various social media properties on line.  Why be active in on line social networks?  That’s where the people are: patients, caregivers, potential collaborators and referral sources, like many, many other people, are using social media more and more.  Facebook has become nearly ubiquitous, and its user base is growing not only among the younger set, but also among the older set, who are signing up so they can see pictures of their grandkids.  In today’s wired society, on line social networking is the new word of mouth.  Word-of-mouth referrals, personal recommendations, have always been prized; we have simply moved many of those conversations on line.

Continue reading “Health Care Social Media – How to Engage Online Without Getting into Trouble (Part I)”