The Amazing Journey of the Lowly Aspirin

Dov Michaeli

There are few stories in the annals of medicine that can rival the rise of aspirin from an obscure chemical to the status of something akin to a folk hero (well, at least among medical history buffs). And now it has attained new heights of media fame; every newspaper, news broadcast or blog worth its name has commented on the latest finding of its cancer-protective effect.

Who discovered aspirin?

Like everything else, all paths lead to the ancient Greeks.  Hippocrates, who lived in the 4th century B.C.E described a powder made from the bark and leaves of the willow tree to help heal headaches, pains and fevers. And there it lay for 23 centuries, unexplored and forgotten.

Continue reading “The Amazing Journey of the Lowly Aspirin”

Personal Observations on the Changing Scene in American Medicine – 1955 to 2010

Clifton K. Meador, M.D.

When I entered private practice in 1962 (after graduating from medical school in 1955, completing a medical residency, serving  two years in the Army Medical Corps, and completing a N.I. H. Fellowship in Endocrinology), there was no Medicare, no Medicaid, and very little medical insurance of any kind.  Patients paid cash, vegetables, meat, or nothing.

Continue reading “Personal Observations on the Changing Scene in American Medicine – 1955 to 2010”