The Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Report—Just Fiddling While Rome is Burning

Robert Laszewski

Posted 4/26/12 on Health Care Policy and Marketplace Review

Today’s headline was, “Millions Expected To Receive Insurance Rebates Totaling $1.3 Billion.”

The Kaiser Family Foundation estimates that 3.4 million people in the individual market will receive $426 million in consumer rebates because of the Affordable Care Act’s new MLR rules. In the small group market 4.9 million enrollees will see $377 million in rebates, and 7.5 million people will get $540 million in the large group market.

Wow!

Continue reading “The Medical Loss Ratio (MLR) Report—Just Fiddling While Rome is Burning”

If the Supreme Court Overturns the Individual Mandate

Robert Laszewski

 Posted 3/28/12 on Health Policy and Marketplace Review

First, trying to predict how the Court will rule is at best just speculation. I know what Justice Kennedy said both today and yesterday and it certainly doesn’t look good for the Obama administration and upholding at least the mandate.

But I will remind everyone, based upon oral arguments, most Court watchers expected a ruling in favor of the biotech industry on a recent case involving health care patents. “Surprisingly,” the Court ruled against the industry.

Continue reading “If the Supreme Court Overturns the Individual Mandate”

Will the Pace of Innovative Change Overtake the Financial Imperative to Slash Spending?

Robert Laszewski

Posted 3/08/12 on Health Policy and Marketplace Review

I thought it was worth passing along the comments by Jim Tallon, president of New York’s United Hospital Fund, in a recent post.

Tallon reflected on an international meeting he attended with health care leaders from a number of industrial nations–“nations whose health care systems, indeed underlying philosophies, ranged from market orientation through hybrids to government authority:”

Continue reading “Will the Pace of Innovative Change Overtake the Financial Imperative to Slash Spending?”

So How Are Democrats and Republicans Different?

Robert Laszewski

First published 3/10/11 on Health Policy and Marketplace Review

Just how is the way Wisconsin Republicans have handled the political confrontation over worker rights different than the way Washington, DC Democrats handled last year’s health care vote?

With apologies in advance to Ezra for taking some liberties with his column yesterday evening in the Washington Post:

Continue reading “So How Are Democrats and Republicans Different?”

Karl Rove’s Criticism of AARP Was an Uninformed Cheap Shot

ROBERT LASZEWSKI

Originally published 1/06/11 on Health Policy and Marketplace Review

Readers of this blog know that I am willing to call AARP out when I think they deserve it. Witness my recent post criticizing their reaction to the chairs of the Deficit Commission and their preliminary report when AARP acted more like a narrow minded advocate than an enlightened organization that understands the inevitability of fundamental reform to the entitlements.

And, I have never been comfortable with their advocacy for both the Republican Part D program as well as the Democratic health care bill when a big share of their revenue comes from health insurance commissions.
Continue reading “Karl Rove’s Criticism of AARP Was an Uninformed Cheap Shot”

Improving The Health Law In 2011: Realistic Ways To Reach Bipartisan Compromise

ROBERT LASZEWSKI

Originally published 1/4/2010 on Kaiser Health News.

The new health care law can be changed in ways that would make it acceptable to a bipartisan majority in the new Congress — and, therefore, to the American people. But to find this elusive middle ground requires consideration of the competing philosophies at the heart of the nation’s political divisions regarding this sweeping measure.

Continue reading “Improving The Health Law In 2011: Realistic Ways To Reach Bipartisan Compromise”

What Would Happen If You Were To Pass a Big Health Care Bill Without Bipartisan Support?

ROBERT LASZEWSKI

Originally Published on Health Policy and Marketplace Review here.

During the recent health care debate I heard many people on both sides of the debate worry out loud about passing a heath care bill that did not enjoy broad support.

I guess this question is no longer a theoretical one.

Continue reading “What Would Happen If You Were To Pass a Big Health Care Bill Without Bipartisan Support?”