The Game’s Not Over, and It May Not Even Be The Real Game

Brian Klepper

Posted 6/29/12 on Medscape Connect’s Care and Cost Blog

ImageLike most health law watchers, I was surprised by yesterday’s decision. I’m sure that on this issue, as with everything else, zealous responses will rationalize the result and split the country down the middle.

I expected the Court to be purely partisan, but apparently Chief Justice John Roberts acknowledged the gravity of his role and saw his way clear to support the law with some constraints. Here’s the comment from SCOTUS (Supreme Court of the United States) Blog: 

Salvaging the idea that Congress did have the power to try to expand health care to virtually all Americans, the Supreme Court on Monday upheld the constitutionality of the crucial – and most controversial – feature of the Affordable Care Act. By a vote of 5-4, however, the Court did not sustain it as a command for Americans to buy insurance, but as a tax if they don’t. That is the way Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., was willing to vote for it, and his view prevailed. The other Justices split 4-4, with four wanting to uphold it as a mandate, and four opposed to it in any form.

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Patient Engagement and Medical Homes – Core Drivers of a High-Performing Health System

Jane Sarasohn-Kahn

Posted 3/30/12 on Health Populi

It was Dr. Charles Safran who said, “Patients are the most under-utilized resource in the U.S. health system,” which he testified to Congress in 2004. Seven years later, patients are still under-utilized, not just in the U.S. but around the world.

Yet, “when patients have an active role in their own health care, the quality of their care, and of their care experience improves,” assert researchers from The Commonwealth Fund in their analysis of 2011 global health consumer survey data published in the April/June 2010 issue of the Journal of Ambulatory Care Management. This analysis is summarized inInternational Perspectives on Patient Engagement: Results from the 2011 Commonwealth Fund Survey, published on The Commonwealth Fund’s website on March 29, 2012.

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Day Three – The Wrap Up

Merrill Goozner

Posted 3/29/12 on Gooz News

This is what conservative justices will do if they strike down or cripple the health-care law … A court that gave us Bush v. Gore and Citizens United will prove conclusively that it sees no limits on its power, no need to defer to those elected to make our laws. A Supreme Court that is supposed to give us justice will instead deliver ideology. now  – E.J. Dionne, The Washington Post

The insurance mandate was effectively reduced to a bumper sticker by the opponents in their constitutional challenge, and the entire law reduced to little more than an appendage to the mandate. . . The fate of the mandate should not determine the survival of the other elements of the law — like prohibiting insurers from denying coverage to people with pre-existing conditions or charging them higher fees — which can operate without the mandate. – New York Times editorial

Overturning the whole law would be an act of judicial restraint. – The Wall Street Journal editorial

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Health IT in 2012: a Dynamic Sector in the Context of a Fiscally-Challenged Health System

Jane Sarasohn-Kahn

Posted 12/20/11 on Health Populi

2012 will be a dynamic year for health information technology (health IT) in the U.S., which I outline in my annual health IT forecast in iHealthBeat, the online publication on technology and health care published by the California HealthCare Foundation. The full forecast can be found here.

The key headlines for you Reader’s Digest abridged fans are that:

  • The Health IT sector will continue to grow jobs in the ongoing Great Depression, particularly in key competencies in data security, analytics, integration, and EHR implementation.
  • There will be more data breaches, and consumers will be justifiably concerned about data security. Government will more consistently implement sharper “teeth” in their punishment of health organizations who leak personal health information.
  • Health IT suppliers will consolidate. The Microsoft-GE combination, announced in December 2011, is a sentinel event in this regard.
  • Health IT start-ups will continue to emerge in 2012, some of which will have sound business models that will be acquired by larger firms to round out their offerings and address, in particular, consumer/patient-facing applications that support health engagement to enhance health outcomes.
  • Connected health, in the form of telemedicine, mobile health, and remote health monitoring to the home will gain traction and business models as health payment moves toward accountable care, medical home, and paying for outcomes.
  • IBM’s Watson is an example of high-powered data analytics, which will get more practical and targeted in 2012. A ripe area for this will be preventing re-hospitalizations, a focus of health reform and Medicare financing.
  • People – patients and providers – live multi-channel, multi-platform lives every day. Thismodus vivendi is translating into health and health care. Patients want online connections with doctors for administration (e.g., Rx refills and appointments), clinical decision making, and communications (e.g., email with practices).

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Affordable Care Act: A Date With Destiny

Roger Collier

Posted 12/19/11 on Health Care Reform Update

The schedule for the Supreme Court to hear arguments on the constitutionality of provisions of the Affordable Care Act was announced this week. The following is the agenda.

On March 26, the Court has allotted an hour to hear arguments on whether the Anti-Injunction Act makes challenges to the individual mandate premature until 2015. With neither the government nor the ACA’s opponents pressing the point, the argument for the precedence of the Anti-Injunction Act—an argument that four appellate judges had earlier found convincing—will be presented by Washington attorney Robert Long as a “friend of the court”.

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